Your thoughts on the shooting on Parliament hill

Our society is based on fundamental legal principles. One of those principles is that a victim can not make justice for itself.

We, MPs in the House of Commons, have been the victim of an attempted murder by what appears increasingly to be an isolated act of someone with psychological distress. We as MPs have the power to change laws. I firmly believe that in the case before us, we must make an extra effort to keep a cool head and have the interests of citizens at the center of our concerns. We must not upset the delicate balance between security and individual rights without a real social debate. We need to reflect on the tragedy that has occurred and avoid the temptation to drift to a paranoid security obsession.

We must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.

Tell me what you think about the events and what should come next:


Showing 260 reactions

  • Of course the bill is rushed. The conservatives are trigger happy and war-mongers. The actions were that of a misguided, mentally unstable man who had spent years in and out of the prison system. If the conservative focused more on alleviating poverty and bringing back well-paying full-time jobs rather than outsourcing to the highest bidder, we would not have these kinds of problems in Canada.
  • Alexandre,

    I totally agree with your sentiments. Harper does not seem to understand that his government’s policies such as his “tough on crime initiatives” his so-called “anti-terrorism bills” and the decision to send military force to Iraq has made Canada less safe than we were before he gained majority power.

    The loss of two military personnel on Canadian soil is tragic. But where is Harper’s response to the 1,100 missing or murdered aboriginal women and girls?

    What consideration does Harper have for the population of Gaza, held hostage by the Israeli’s and subjected to indiscriminate bombing?

    Let us not lose perspective in these matters and temper our reaction with a reality check.
  • Our freedom is best protected with clear, calm thoughts. Restricting activities serves only to fear the unknown. The two tragic events should result in the monitoring/arresting of like minded individuals who perpetrated these activities. Take away their citizenship and remove them from Canada. We should not pay to imprison our enemies. The out-pouring of emotion for these two soldiers, begs the question – What about the treatment all veterans, particularly those who served in recent years. The current gov’t has done little in this regard and should be ashamed – voted out would be better. I’m a veteran.
  • Do nothing, Canada has been fine for all these years treat the person or people involved as either criminals or terrorists. But don’t enable the government to change a thing.


    All too often govenerments use a tragedy to bring sweeping new powers for the government, not the people this happened in nazi Germany with the reichstag fire and recently in the US with 9/11. Guard our country by first learning what if any failings happened that day and make smaller measures to avoid it in the future. But please learn from history don’t let Canada be changed not due to the shooting but the government’s reaction to the shooting. Canada is free please keep it that way.
  • Thank you for reaching out and the question. Yes I am worried that the federal government is using the tragedy to push an agenda that is against the human rights’ values of all Canadians. It is also imperative that in times like these that a cool handed approach of how to proceed is required. Doing things in a frantic crazed knee-jerked response plays into the interests of those that want to damage the political freedoms we enjoy and want to protect.
  • In this time of uncertainty, we must use cool and clear heads, Jumping into things can be chancy. Sometimes, quick fixes work, but they are more likely to fail in the long run. The leaders of this country must act carefully and responsibly, taking all possibilities into consideration. This is no time to be a “bull in a China shop”, we don’t need hasty decisions. The tragic events of last week have opened our eyes to things happening around the world. Use this time to reflect on concrete and lasting strategies that will benefit all Canadians today, and in the future. We all need to work towards maintaining the peace, freedom and rights of all individuals. We can not lose sight of that. You walk a tight line, I don’t envy that, but make sure your decisions are worthy of the people you represent.
  • I’m proud to be a Canadian. I truly believe this is the best country in the world to live in. The outpouring of support and solidarity in the face of tragedies for the CIrillo and Vincent families has, at it’s core, shown what it is to be a Canadian. Using these tragedies and outpouring of support to further an agenda to diminish the freedoms and quality of life of every Canadian is nothing more than opportunistic. Times like these require thoughtful debate, a thorough understanding of the issue, and careful, measured responses that address real deficiencies in policy, not a knee jerk reaction.
  • I agree with you completely! We must be careful not to fall into Mr.Harper’s trap. We have already lost too many of our civl liberties under this government. As well, Mr Harper and his policies have made us a target! Let us get out of the Middle East and let us take a balanced position on the Israeli/Palestinian situation!
  • I believe that this is much more an issue of mental health. We do not do a job. Ask teachers. Ask psychologists. Turning sick people into an international conspiracy makes little sense. They do violent things that could be attached to any cause local, national, international, just plain wretched human beings. Many were bullied in school, were losers. These people may get their revenge by living their pain in terrible ways. What is needed is a serious effort to help these people while they are children. For the rest, mental health institutions is likely the best solution.
  • While I believe that our country needs to improve security, my fear is that the Harper government will use this as an excuse to further trample on the civil rights of Canadians. I expect that he will enact Draconian laws that militate against freedom of speech and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.. I believe it is part of his party’s political agenda, in order to silence dissent . I believe that we need to challenge this with all the powers that we have, including the Supreme Court.
  • These events should not be used to increase powers for institutions which already abuse what they have. (Ex. spying on Canadians via wifi at airports).

    These soldiers have died in the name of freedom. Their deaths must not be used as a ploy to take that same freedom away. Privacy IS part of this freedom. It is not not for ANY government to take away.

    My Canada is not a police state. Unfortunately, it seems like it’s becoming one.

    This type of legislation is sneaky. It was planned long time ago, but comes veiled as a knee-jerk reaction for the sake of “security.” People die in car crashes every day. This doesn’t mean we should ban driving, or record everyone at the wheel.

    Additionally, the argument “if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear” is a manipulative attempt at compliance. It’s like saying that some crimes happen in basements, so police should have keys to your house. Yes, some crimes occur indoors. No, you can’t have a set of my house keys.

    Do not take away my privacy because you’re scared. I’m not afraid. I’d rather take my chances every day, than be watched.
  • We need to keep cool heads. Don’t over react. The PM immediately said it was terrorists

    before the facts were in. This was one gunman.
  • While I believe that our country needs to improve security, my fear is that the Harper government will use this as an excuse to further trample on the civil rights of Canadians. I expect that he will enact Draconian laws that militate against freedom of speech and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.. I believe it is part of his party’s political agenda, in order to silence dissent . I believe that we need to challenge this with all the powers that we have, including the Supreme Court.
  • This random act of violence from two men needing mental health treatment is being used to further the madmen of the harper government. If it wasn’t so tragic one would almost believe that for harper it came at the right time so that he could further his blind and maniacal agenda to push this country into a koch brother nation, one of bombs, tar sands, and American tea party philosophy of making the rich richer and the poor poorer. I am throughly discussed by the people in our government but even more so with the Canadian people that continue in their state of amnesia and denial that keep these people in power. This technology for spying will be used for the most part to make sure that harper and his minions can continue to move their vision of staying in power. I send my condolences to the families that have lost their love ones in the harper war mongering but I hope that Canadians will wake up really fast and kick their asses of power before it is too late.
  • I believe that victims of crime should have more rights then the criminal. Right now the criminal have more rights than the victims. That needs to change.
  • I think it is always best to wait tell things cool down as we make decitions quickly and may not be the wright one to make.
  • We should avoid to imitate the Americans with their Patriot Act after 2001. Let’s keep a balance between security and protection of human rights. A public debate should be put ahead before thinking of a new repressive law.
  • I think that the RCMP and/or CSIS’ efforts to dig up evidence that shows this insane act was politically or religiously motivated misses the point. It was clearly the act of a deeply disturbed person with substance abuse and mental health issues, whatever his political or religious views may have been. Had he just killed some random person on the street, he would have received a fraction of the attention that he has. The fact that he chose such a symbolic target, however, has given him tremendous notoriety and altered the narrative in a way that distresses me deeply. It seems to me that reacting to this tragedy by turning this country into even more of a police state than it’s already become under the Harper Conservatives is giving far more power to M. Zehaf-Bibeau than he deserves. While this incident had clearly shown that Parliament might want to take a look at its security procedures, apart from that, I think the most appropriate response to this tragedy is to continue to live our lives exactly as we were living them before. If the aim is to show the world that we are truly not intimidated by this craven act, that’s the most graphic demonstration of our resolve that I can think of. Giving more power to our intelligence and police services at the expense of even more civil liberties is tantamount to handing the terrorists of the world a victory.
  • I do not want to live in a country where our individual human rights and democratic values are subject to ‘knee-jerk’ reactions on speculation of potential treats. Fear should not be the great equalizer. Common sense should prevail in all situations.
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
  • I agree with you, “must not give in to fear. We should not act on the heat of the moment without a thorough reflexion and debate.”
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